Clean Drinking Water for IDPs from Mosul area

Residents of the Qayyarah Airstrip Emergency Site have greater access to clean drinking water with the help of a newly acquired emergency water treatment system. 

With support from USAID, the new LMS unit is providing IDPs in the Airstrip with up to 60,000 liters of clean drinking water every day. 

The Danish Refugee Council is the first organization in Iraq to deploy an LMS system, which provides filtered and treated water to conflict-affected people displaced by the Mosul military operations. 

Trucks start by bringing in raw water from the nearby Tigris River, which is transferred to two tanks with a combined capacity of 70,000 liters. 

That water is then pumped through the LMS, twice filtered, and treated before heading into a storage tank. 

Trucks inside the camp then deliver the treated water to 16 points across the Airstrip for camp residents to have access to clean, safe drinking water. 

Dunya, 18, is one of 30 hygiene promoters in the camp who monitor the drinking water points and help educate residents on keeping themselves healthy and safe as well as keeping their environment clean. 

“People used to complain about the water quality as well as kidney problems from drinking untreated water,” said Dunya. “Now, people are drinking more water because they aren’t afraid anymore.” 

Clean drinking water in the camp is currently supplemented by chlorinated water for washing and other uses. 

Meanwhile, the Danish Refugee Council is working to construct a water treatment plant nearby with a 200 m³/hour output to ensure even greater access to clean water.

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